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2015 NFL Draft Results: How does the first round affect Buffalo alumni?

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Kelley L Cox-USA TODAY Sports

The first round of the NFL Draft happened last night. You can read about it elsewhere. UB played a much smaller role in the event than last year, but I can still grift the biggest sports story of the weekend for a Bull Run post.

It's only one round down, so I'll probably do this again this weekend, but how does the first round affect the stock of UB alumni in the NFL?

Oakland Raiders (Khalil Mack)

With the fifth pick The Raiders took Alabama WR Amari Cooper, an offensive powerhouse who will pair with second-year quarterback Derek Carr. Not that Khalil's status with the team was in any doubt anyway, but the only way that Cooper will affect Mack at all is perhaps keep the Raiders defense off the field for longer stretches.

San Diego Chargers (Branden Oliver)

This one is no good. Not only did the Chargers take Wisconsin's Melvin Gordon, one of the consensus top-two running backs available, but they gave up a 2015 fourth-round pick and a 2016 fifth-rounder to move up two spots. It looked days ago like San Diego made things a little easier for BO when they cut ties with Ryan Mathews, but now the Charger backfield is just as crowded as it had been for Oliver.

Green Bay Packers (James Starks)

Much like the Raiders, the Packers went to the opposite side of the ball, grabbing Arizona State free safety Damarious Randall. Starks is most likely safe for this year; he's set to make 1.8 million between salary and bonuses, but 2015 is also the final year of his current two-year contract with the Packers.

Baltimore Ravens (Steven Means)

Another pick on the opposite side, as the Ravens took wide receiver Breshad Perriman from Central Florida. This is probably the spot I was most worried about, given Means has already bounced a bit and there were a handful of very good defensive lineman still on the board. Of the four players in this post, Means probably still has the greatest threat remaining.